Exhibitions

Djanogly Art Gallery, Wirksworth Arts Festival and Various European Galleries

Landmarks, Horizon, View From Macdui

Landmarks is a series of early works. Some are based on landscape views - such as ‘View From Macdui’ - inspired by climbing in the Scottish mountains and the views from that area. Others reference the geological structure of the earth and natural patterns of layered strata formed over time. The work is constructed to reflect this idea further, through the process of layering and shaping translucent resin forms using a variety of casting techniques. The cast resin forms absorb the light to become solid blocks of pure illuminated colour.

Making Sense

‘Making Sense’ was designed to communicate the difficulty and frustration experienced by people with dyslexia when faced with written words and signs. The artist himself is severely dyslexic, so this subject was particularly significant for him. The cubic structure features blocks of text made up from random sequences of letters. These disintegrate into abstract half-letters and shapes at the outer-edges of each of the four faces. The viewer is invited to decipher the text and discover words and meaning.

Interactive

‘Interactive’ was commissioned by 20/21 Visual Arts Centre to explore sight through light and interaction. The work was made from 19 light bulbs set within glass domes and positioned in a circular display, using a combination of four different colours: blue, yellow, red and green. Blue and yellow enhance clarity for visually impaired people while red and green reduce clarity, being less easily distinguished from other colours. A switchboard allowed visitors to the gallery to interact with the sculpture and select which colours were illuminated.

Art In Empty Spaces

I took this photo while driving around the city of Hull capturing the city’s environment at night and the light trails created by the city on long exposures from 5 minutes to 15 minutes. The photos were taken while using a 10 - 24 wide-angle lens and I created the image by attaching the camera to the inside of my car and driving around the city. They are printed on Dura Tran, mounted on acrylic and lit from behind within a light box.

Boxed In

These works have text hidden within the make up of dot forms. Like a word search, each line makes up a word or phrase relating to the situation that Hull and the UK are in at this moment. The work touches on the need not to “spend, spend, spend” so much and looks at the rise and fall of the economy, through interest rates, percentages and the endless play with statistics, look hard to find the hidden words.

Which Way Now 2

Working with Hull City Council and the Shop Front initiative, Arc commissioned four artists to each have a 10-week installation in the windows of the empty shops on Whitefriargate, and using the street as a gallery to exhibit their work. I wanted my work to respond with the reason the empty spaces were there. The work is about the economic downturn, that through excessive spending we have gotten ourselves into this financial mess and I wanted to make some works that reflected this while being positive and looking at ways we can deal with it

Reflection

Working with Hull City Council and the Shop Front initiative, Arc commissioned four artists to each have a 10-week installation in the windows of the empty shops on Whitefriargate, and using the street as a gallery to exhibit their work. "I wanted my work to respond with the reason the empty spaces were there.

The Car Park Drum

This commission is to light the inside of the car park drum with the Waterproof T5 fluorescent Stick-Lite lighting from Encapsulate, the strips of lights will be attached vertically to the inside of the anodised aluminium, lighting the perforated holes from the inside. The idea is to create a wave of light merging in together and flowing around the circle of the car park drum, the colours used within the work will be blues and greens relating to water, which surrounds the dockland area. These colours will merge into each other creating middle tones throughout the structure.

Light forms, Corona

The process of making Light forms involved pouring thin layers of resin into a mould, allowing it to set before pouring another. Colour pigments were added to the resin to build up layers upon layers to create a spectrum of colour. Although abstract in design, the subtle graduation of colour and line evoke the layering of the landscape such as the skyline during sunrise.

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